Your Views

Minister’s remarks are a smokescreen that won’t fix housing crisis…

In response to housing minister Gavin Barwell’s comments on parents disinheriting their children and leaving their assets to their grandchildren…

I think it is for each family to make their decisions on inheritance issues. The call is a bit of a smokescreen to cover the need for a more fundamental review of housing policy. Piecemeal and ad hoc statements like this will not solve the issue.

We need to look at the supply of homes and determine how the public and private sectors can work together to deliver what is needed.

Paul Winter, Ipswich Building Society

…but what he suggests is already happening and makes sense for some

It may have been a flippant comment – which is not that helpful from a housing minister who is meant to have a plan to combat these issues – but actually we are already seeing evidence of this as the ‘Bank of Nan & Grandad’ becomes more prolific.

It does make sense for some families to leave their wealth to their grandchildren, especially if their children already have more than enough to get by, but as always it depends on the situation. In theory, everything will get passed down in any case.

Andrew Montlake, Coreco Group

No complacency over better complaints data – consumers are savvy

Regarding the FCA complaints data…

It’s pleasing to see that the number of complaints overall has continued to fall to a total of 2.05 million and that financial services firms recorded a 2.6 per cent reduction overall, with almost all product categories seeing a reduction in redress payments compared to the second half of 2015.

Challenges remain, however, with general insurance and pure protection (including PPI) complaints in particular increasing by 6 per cent.

While those figures are unsurprising, all eyes will be on the regulator in December. It has promised to publish its decision on a deadline for PPI complaints, as well as rules and guidance on handling PPI complaints in light of the Plevin case.

The industry is also watching carefully the continued impact of the July changes to complaint-handling rules. The next set of FCA complaint data will provide even greater insight as all complaints become reportable.

Indications are that consumers are becoming more complaint savvy, so firms need to respond to this challenge. Whether through personal education, media attention or information being more readily available via popular money and blog sites, customers are better informed and equipped to make complaints about poor service.

In the age of social media and increased transparency around complaints handling, it is even more crucial to respond accordingly and ensure the handling process is sophisticated enough to meet the demands of more educated, discerning and demanding customers.

Terry Baxter, Target Group