What will it take for India to become an absolute winner?

By Kunal Desai, Manager of Neptune India Fund

Kunal Desai recently celebrated his third anniversary as manager of the Neptune India Fund. Kunal has built a strong track record of outperformance since he assumed responsibility for the Fund, delivering a return of 30.3 per cent ompared to the MSCI India Index gain of just 14.0 per cent.*

After 2014’s stellar gains, India has continued to outperform its emerging market peers, but absolute returns have been lacklustre. Under the reform-minded government of Narendra Modi, what will it take for India to become a shining light in a global context?

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*Source: Lipper, as at 22 January 2016. C Accumulation share class performance, in pound sterling, with net income reinvested and no initial charges. The performance of other share classes may differ.

Important Information: Investment risks

This fund may have a high volatility rating and past performance is not a guide to future performance. The value of an investment and any income from it can fall as well as rise as a result of market and currency fluctuations and your clients may not get back the original amount invested. Investments in emerging markets are higher risk and potentially more volatile than those in established markets. A majority of investments made by the fund may be in smaller and medium-sized companies which can be higher risk than those in larger companies. References to specific securities are for illustration purposes only and should not be taken as a solicitation to buy or sell these securities. Neptune funds are not tied to replicating a benchmark and holdings can therefore vary from those in the index quoted. For this reason the comparison index should be used for reference only.

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