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Brandon Lewis to remain housing minister despite confusion

Brandon Lewis will remain housing minister despite reports he had been replaced.

Yesterday, it was being wrongly claimed on Twitter that Mark Francois had been made the new housing minister after he was appointed minister of state for communities and local government.

The rumours were fuelled by the fact Lewis’ photo and profile had been taken of the Department for Communities and Local Government’s website. At the same time Francois’ profile said his responsibilities had yet to be determined.

However, today Lewis’ picture has reappeared on DCLG’s website and it has been confirmed he will remain as housing minister.

Lewis, a qualified barrister, was made housing minister in July 2014, with added responsibility for planning.

It was the second error of the prime minister’s reshuffle. Yesterday, erroneous reports circulated that David Gauke had been made pensions minister when it had in fact been Ros Altmann.

Greg Clark, the MP for Royal Tunbridge Wells, has replaced Eric Pickles as secretary of state for communities and local government. He was previously minister for universities and science.

Mark Francois joined DCLG, the department responsible for housing, as minister of state for Communities and Local Government

Francois, the Conservative MP for Rayleigh and Wickford since 2001, has been minister of state for the armed forces for the past two years. He was also shadow economic secretary to the Treasury between 2004 and 2005 and has also be shadow paymaster general.

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Comments
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  • Chris Hulme 13th May 2015 at 9:35 am

    Ah yes, Twitter. The stable mate for all that is newsworthy that is most likely to have been made up!

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