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Abbey cuts rates and launches new deals

Abbey for Intermediaries is reducing rates on its fixed rate products and has launched some new three and five-year fixed rates.

This Friday it will reduce rates again on its fixed rate products as follows:

  • Rate reduced by 0.30% on five-year fix at 70% LTV for remortgagers, now 4.69% with a £995 fee
  • Rate reduced by 0.20% on five-year fix at 75% LTV for homebuyers, now 4.79% with a £995 fee
  • Rate reduced by 0.16% on four-year fix at 70% LTV for homebuyers, now 4.29% with a £995 fee
  • Rate reduced by 0.16%t on four-year fix at 75% LTV for homebuyers, now 4.59% with a £995 fee
  • Rate reduced by 0.16% on four-year fix at 75% LTV for Loyal Movers, now 4.59% with a £495 fee
  • Rate reduced by 0.10% on two-year fix at 70%t LTV for homebuyers, now 3.09% with a £995 fee
  • Rate reduced by 0.10% on two-year fix at 70% LTV for Loyal Movers, now 2.99% with a £495 fee
  • Rate reduced by 0.08% on three-year fix at 75% LTV for homebuyers, now 4.27% with a £995 fee

In addition, AFI will be launching the following new products:

  •   Five-year fix at 4.99% with a £995 fee, available to remortgagers up to 75% LTV
  • Three-year tracker at 2.99%, available to homebuyers up to 75% LTV with a 1% fee
  •  Three-year tracker at 3.19%, available to remortgagers up to 75% LTV with a 1% fee

All of these products come with the Homebuyer or Remortgage Solution respectively. The Homebuyer Solution offers borrowers the added benefits of a free basic mortgage valuation and £250 cashback on completion, while the Remortgage Solution offers a free basic mortgage valuation, and either free legals or £250 cashback on completion.

Alan Mathewson, Managing Director of Abbey for Intermediaries, says: “Our latest rate cuts provide even greater choice to customers looking for the security of a fixed rate mortgage, with our market leading four and five year deals sure to appeal to borrowers wanting to lock into a great rate for the longer term. We are also pleased to be able to extend our tracker range to support intermediaries, with the launch of two highly competitive new products.”

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