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Private housing orders rise by 10%, reveals DTI

Research from the Department of Trade and Industry has shown that private housing orders in the year to October rose by 10% compared to those in the previous year.

Orders in the three months to October fell by 6% compared with the previous period, but rose by 7% when compared with the same period a year earlier.

Public housing and housing association orders rose by 2% in the year to October 2005 compared with the previous year.

Public housing and housing association orders in the three months to October rose by 4% compared to the previous period, but fell by 10% compared to the same period a year earlier. All comparisons in this sector are affected by large variations due to its relatively small size.

New construction orders in the year to October rose by 7% compared to orders in the previous 12-month period, and orders in the three months to October rose by 16% compared to the same period a year earlier.

Orders in the three months to October 2005 fell by 2%compared to the previous period, with decreases in all sectors except public and housing association orders and private commercial orders. All orders figures quoted are seasonally adjusted and in constant prices.

The figures also show that infrastructure orders in the year to October increased by 40% compared with the previous year. Orders in the three months to October fell by 14% compared with the previous period, but rose by 56% when compared to the same period a year earlier.

Public non-housing orders, excluding infrastructure, in the year to October fell by 1% compared with the previous twelve months period.

Orders in the three months to October fell by 4% compared with the previous period, but were unchanged when compared to the same period a year earlier.

Private commercial orders in the year to October fell by 3% compared with the previous year. Orders in the three months to October rose by 13% compared to the previous period, and by 32% compared to the same period a year earlier.

Private industrial orders in the year to October rose by 11% compared to the previous year. Orders in the three months to October fell by 13% compared to the previous period and by 8% compared to the same period a year earlier.

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