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Low rate fixed for one year

Catholic has released a one-year fixed product for new purchases and remortgages. The Issue 1 mortgage has a rate of 2.9% for the first year with a discount off the SVR of 0.75% in years two and three. The deal includes free valuations and free legals for remortgages.

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RBS staff held to account

The Royal Bank of Scotland Group has warned its UK staff that they must have their primary bank account with the group or face disciplinary action.

Lenders report increased shortfalls after sale of property

Nearly half of lenders have reported an increase in shortfalls after sale of property, a survey by litigation specialists Moore & Blatch reveals.The research, which included high street banks, building societies and specialist prime and sub-prime lenders, showed that of those who said that they were seeing an increase in shortfalls, 100% thought that they […]

Reversions boom predicted

Home reversion plans will take up to 10% of the equity release market within the next two years, says Bridgewater Equity Release.

Strong dollar can be a powerful driver of UK dividend growth in 2015

By Robin Geffen, fund manager and CEO 

This year threatens to be a challenging one for UK dividend hunters. Last year saw an all-time record amount paid out in UK dividends — some £97.4bn, according to research from Capita Dividend Monitor. Yet as Capita also pointed out, out the biggest single factor driving the growth in the fourth quarter of last year was easy to identify: the rising US dollar. 

In our view, this trend is much more than simply a one-quarter phenomenon. It is actually the most profound issue to get right as a UK equity income investor in 2015. We believe that the US dollar will continue to strengthen significantly from its current level. This is due more to the US economy’s demonstrable de-coupling from the rest of the world than to a view on the UK. The US has a strong chance of tightening monetary conditions this year without jeopardising growth or de-stabilising its housing market. The same can unfortunately not be said about the UK.

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