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Pushing housing up the political agenda

RICHARD SEXTON, DIRECTOR OF BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT, E.SURV
RICHARD SEXTON, DIRECTOR OF BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT, E.SURV

No doubt readers will be pleased that we have reached a conclusion with respect to who will run the country.

But we would do well to remember that after the excitement comes the cold, hard fact of belt tightening in many areas.

It should be hoped that this will not affect the housing market recovery, which is central to the economy as well as significant to consumer confidence.People move house when they feel hopeful and rising prices give them confidence.

So it was disappointing to find scant mention of property in any of the three main manifestos.

In the third televised debate the candidates exhibited various degrees of squirm factor when confronted with questions on housing. Gordon Brown made reference to a shared equity scheme that was on the way when in fact it was already up and running.

Nick Clegg gave cause for hope when he identified the oversupply of one-bedroom new-build flats in city centres as a problem.

But his solution of converting them into family homes neglected the construction of these units, as well as the fact that it’s difficult to walk the dog on the 29th floor.

Stakeholders need to work together to ensure housing, finance and related sectors remain on the government agenda.

This may mean participating in processes that have no direct benefit to our businesses but like an election, you’ve got to be in it to win it.

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