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Fed bails out AIG

The US Federal Reserve has bailed out beleaguered global insurer American International Group to the tune of $85bn.

The Fed determined that under the current circumstances, a disorderly failure of AIG could add to already significant levels of financial market fragility and lead to substantially higher borrowing costs, reduced household wealth, and materially weaker economic performance.

It says the secured loan has terms and conditions designed to protect the interests of both the US government and taxpayers.

The AIG facility has a 24-month term. Interest will accrue on the outstanding balance at a rate of three-month Libor plus 850 basis points. AIG will be permitted to draw up to $85bn under the facility.

It says the loan will facilitate a process under which AIG will sell certain of its businesses in an orderly manner, with the least possible disruption to the overall economy.

The loan is expected to be repaid from the proceeds of the sale of the firm’s assets.

The U.S. government will receive a 79.9% equity interest in AIG and has the right to veto the payment of dividends to common and preferred shareholders.

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