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Heritable appoints marketing director

Heritable Bank has appointed Alan Gilmour to the newly created role of marketing director. Gilmour was previously at Lloyds TSB and was responsible for the launch of the combined Lloyds TSB brand following the 1999 merger.

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Brokers are worth more than this

It’s about time lenders started valuing brokers more highly for the work they do, maybe paying them an hourly rate for the time they spend on cases, says Sue Read

BoE raises base rate to 5.25%

The Bank of England’s Monetary Policy Committee has voted to increase the base rate 0.25 percentage points to 5.25%. Industry pundits largely expected the MPC to hold rates in Janaury, before a predicted rate rise in February. The last interest rate rise was in November. The MPC says an increase in interest rates to 5.25% […]

HBOS appoints head of mortgages

Joe Higgins has been appointed head of mortgages at HBOS.He will oversee product development, and mortgage policies and strategies across the lenders five brands. Higgins, currently chief operating officer at Bank of Scotland Ireland, will take up his role from March 5. He has been with HBOS for 10 years. He will report to Peter […]

Government announces national financial advice service

The government has launched its long-term approach to financial capability which includes designing a national generic advice service. Ed Balls, economic secretary to the Treasury, revealed that a new taskforce, led by Otto Thoresen, chief executive of AEGON UK, has been asked to research and design a national generic financial advice service – ensuring that […]

Japan Economic Insight

James Dowey, Chief Economist, and Paul Caruana-Galizia, Economist

The conventional wisdom is that following a roughly 50 per cent rise in the stock market in 2013 in Yen terms, the Japan trade is over and done*. So the story goes, those big gains were due to a one-off boost from quantitative easing (QE) and a depreciation of the Yen — policies that one should think of as a palliative to Japan’s economic weakness, but not a cure. Rather the cure, and by implication the necessary condition for a longer-term investment case, is deep structural reforms — a painstaking re-weaving of Japan’s economic and social fabric, no less. The story continues: this is a much tougher test than launching a blast of QE, and one that prime minister Shinzo Abe, although well intentioned and well supported by the public thus far, is likely to fail. Stick a fork in Japan, it’s done…continue reading

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