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RBSIP introduces new rates to First Active range

RBS Intermediary Partners will be introducing new rates to its First Active fixed rate products.

The new rates will include a two-year fixed rate deal which will only be available online at 5.99% with a 699 arrangement fee.

For all First Active residential remortgage products there are no basic legal or valuation fees.

Overpayments of up to 10% of the original balance per annum are allowed during the initial deal period and a higher lending charge may apply.

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