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New tool shows brokers real-time view of client affordability

inflation, shoppingEquifax and financial technology provider Castlight have launched a real-time affordability “passport” for mortgage brokers and borrowers.

The new tool will give consumers the option to let brokers view their credit history, combined with a summarised overview of their spending behaviour.

The firms say it is the first of its kind and will support brokers and their clients by reducing the time it takes to make a mortgage application to as little as ten minutes.

The information will be provided in the form of an Affordability Passport created by the mortgage applicant in a secure and private portal.

Data is gathered in real-time and combined with a historic view of the way the consumer manages their credit.

Equifax UK banking and financial institutions director Jake Ranson says: “Working with specialist technology partners from across the industry is a great way to innovate on behalf of both clients and consumers so we are excited to be working with Castlight to deliver something unique to the market.

“Industry initiatives like Open Banking Standards highlight the financial industry’s commitment to reform itself to help customers take more control over their data and make it easier for the financial services industry to use data on behalf of customers in a variety of helpful and innovative ways.”

Castlight chief executive Phil Grady says: “This platform significantly reduces the time it takes for the mortgage process to be completed, and provides brokers with a framework to give informed, detailed advice much earlier in the client engagement process.”

Paradigm Mortgage Services will be one of the first distributors of the new platform.

Paradigm chief executive Bob Hunt says: “This tool significantly aids not just the client in understanding their true financial status, and their attractiveness as potential borrowers, but we believe it is able to offer a substantial benefit to the mortgage application process.

“With the advent of Open Banking and PSD2 we are about to see significant change in the accessibility and availability of data to clients, who can access their information in this type of secure environment.

“We are particularly pleased to have been chosen as Castlight’s primary distribution partner and we welcome the opportunity to talk to like-minded firms interested in knowing more.”

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