View more on these topics

Property trade bodies back Government build to rent plans

UK-residential-home-house-property-700x450.jpg

The British Property Federation and RICS have welcomed Government plans to boost the build to rented sector and introduce more affordable private rent.

Government plans include changing planning rules so councils proactively plan for more build to rent homes where there is need.

The proposals are also designed to make it easier for private rental developers to offer affordable rents in place of other types of affordable home.

The plans will also see the Government push for longer tenancies which are more family-friendly to provide better security for renters.

The British Property Federation says 35,000 tenants have been offered tenancies of three years or longer since Government action in the area.

British Property Federation chief executive Melanie Leech says:We welcome the Government’s continued support for the build to rent sector. We fully support the introduction of affordable private rent, and the inclusion of build to rent and affordable private rent within the NPPF and Planning Practice Guidance.

“A multi-tenure approach where all housing sectors receive the right policy support is critical to fixing the UK’s broken housing market.”

RICS head of UK external affairs Geoff White says:The Government’s proposals to boost supply across all tenures – including measures to boost build to rent – is a welcome acknowledgement of the extent of the housing challenges and the scale of the response required.”

Housing and planning minister Alok Sharma says: “Whether renting or owning all families should have the security they need to be able to plan for the future.

“That’s why as part of our plan to fix the broken housing market we’ve been taking action to create a bigger and better private rental market, supporting new build to rent developments so that tenants can have greater choice.”

Measures in the Government’s housing white paper, published in February, set out plans to open up the choice of rental properties on the market.

This includes plans to help people in the private rented sector by banning letting agent fees when they sign a new tenancy agreement.

The Government has also introduced new powers under the Housing and Planning Act 2016 to crack down on rogue landlords.

Recommended

Parliament-UK-Government-Dusk-700.jpg
2

Government unveils new build leasehold ban

The Government has announced plans to ban the “unjust” practice of selling new build houses under expensive leasehold terms. Last November it emerged that some property developers had been selling new-build houses on a leasehold basis with very expensive ground rents. Some of the contracts saw ground rents double every 10 years. Today the Department […]

James Chidgey

Housing Watch: Building must not stop

Despite political upheaval, new-build continues to attract buyers with options and incentives not available elsewhere The general election on 8 June divided the popular vote more starkly than any election since 1974. Back then, first Harold Wilson and then James Callaghan led a Labour government with no overall majority; and, in the midst of industrial […]

House-Building-Construction-700.jpg

Government unveils £2.3bn fund to aid homebuilding

The Government has launched a £2.3bn fund for infrastructure projects to help unlock more housebuilding potential. The Housing Infrastructure Fund will fund improvements like the building of roads, bridges, energy networks and other utilities. Funding will also be available to help build new schools, healthcare centres and digital infrastructure. A statement from the Department for […]

In Focus Ebola cover - thumbnail

White paper — In Focus: Ebola Virus Disease

Jelf Employee Benefits focuses on Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) and what this means for businesses with operations in West Africa. This will be of particular interest to those with employees either travelling to, or living within, West Africa, the area affected by the most catastrophic outbreak of Ebola to date.

Newsletter

News and expert analysis straight to your inbox

Sign up